JUJULIFE

JUJU-JUKE-2C

From Soweto to Chicago, from Jakarta to Paris,
from Lagos to London, from Conakry to Berlin.

01 Tshetsha Boys – Tsekeleke Instrumental X Traxman – Geto Djz
02 Tshetsha Boys – Hi Lavaya X Dj Rashad – Get Down On the Floor
03 Thug Entrancer – Death After Life X Ground Mass Lyer – Syncopate
04 LiL JaBBa – CoLLiSioN
05 Sonido Berzerk – Blitz
06 M’bemba Bangoura – Kirin X 101 Juke
07 Le Motel – 45º34º50º – Pygmy Juke
08 Digi – Trwick
09 Digi – Black Therapy
10 Batåk – Alu-Alu Tu Mula Jadi Na Bolon X Dj Roc – Drop My Back
11 Baglady – Rockoff (Bigote Remix) X Vtgnike – Hi Fashion
12 Jumping Back Slash – Number One Big Big
13 Le Motel – 45º34º50º – Right Business
14 Ital Tek – Ultra
15 Cedaa – Zoom
16 Kode 9 – Xingfu Lu
17 Subp Yao – Dat Thing
18 Romare – I wanna Go (Turn Back)
19 Blind prophet – Ease Up (Original Mix)
20 Radar Bird – 3 O’Clock
21 Romare – Your Love (You Give Me Fever)
22 Naked Werewolf – #TheFangs
23 Dj Rashad – Deep Inside
24 Flo Rida – Get Low (Juked by Dj Nehpets)
25 EQ Why – Ghetto Booty 773 (Original Mix)
26 Dj Spinn – Fall Back
27 Tiyiselani Vomaseve – Se Naxaniseka X Dj Rashad – Hands In the Air
28 Mister Ries – The Near Future
29 Dj Rashad, MoonDoctoR & FreshtillDef – Ethno
30 Doctor Jeep – Golden Eye (Original Mix)
31 Sorie Kondi – Yalimamy
32 George Maluleke – Rioheli

NGOMA MIX 13 – Juju-Juke

Ever since drums were banned on most slave plantations in N. America during the 1600s, after the masters discovering that the slaves organized revolts with their talking drums, the expression of poly-rhythms in N. American popular music has primarily been through use of the voice.  This is the reason music in the US is typified by the simple 1-2 “dupple” rhythm, in contrast to more complex beat patterns in South-America or the Caribbean (which kept their drums).  Thus the evolution of all subsequent Afro-North-American music was profoundly shaped, from Blues to Funk to Disco:  kick on the 1, and snare on the 2; all the way down to the late 20th Century – complex poly-rhythms in hiphop is produced with rap, and the drums remain a skeletal, minimalistic boom-bap, as if just to mark time.

Now in the 21st Century a renewed sense of rhythmic complexity returns to  Afro-North-American dance music in the form of Juke/Footwork in Chicago: interlocking 2s and 3s form intricate beat structures, unmistakeably related to many forms of percussion styles in the motherland (but still often keeping that N. American hard snare on the 2).

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: SEPARATE TRACKS OR SINGLE TRACK

This NGOMA volume demonstrates this reconnection, after centuries of separation, between African tradition and Afro-Diaspora:  between Nigerian Juju/Fuji music and Chicago Juke/Footwork, between Ethiopian dance styles and Detroit Ghetto-Tech, between Iberian trad-modern street sounds and American R’n’B/Pop, between Afro-Punk and Club Music, between Congolese Mbira workouts and Hiphop, between Ghanaian and Senegalese drumming and Urban Bass Pressure.   Let us pump up the volume and remember the power and spirit of rhythm which survives every hardship, cruelty, and oppression, and rejoice in the timeless Music Of the Drums.

big thanks to Keith Jones for knowledge passing, Itzi Nallah, Sonic Diaspora and states side massive for making the Juju-Juke tour possible, my B-girls Jessi and Maya for support.Juju-Juke Tour kick off in Belgrade

I have played this set a few times now during the Serbia, Germany, and US East Coast tour  a few weeks ago, and crowds have gone completely BONKERS as the energy went straight through the roof: 500 screaming people and massive MOSH PIT at 3AM during Mikser Festival Belgrade; club crowd which refused to leave, clapping and hollering for 20 minutes after lights went up and sound was turned off at The Shrine Chicago.  I guess the world is more than ready for 160 BPM Afro-Footwork pressure!!!

and here is that adrenaline fueled misanthropic juke edit of South African punk rockers Koos by itself (download and drop into your set if you are wo/man enough :D):