NGOMA Classic 2 – AfroBeat

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Since Fela’s voice is much cooler than mine, i have switched out my intro with his, and this mix originally made to promote BlackBox number 1 has grown into a proper NGOMA release – with a few changes and much new goodness including 2 wicked special edits – one of the Ethio classic by Mahmoud Ahmed (following a funktastic number by Berlin’s own Woima Collective), and another of a very unique cosmic disco track by the techno head Lego Welt’s Afrocentric alter ego Nacho Patrol. Old version of this mix can still be heard Rebootfm – 11-dj-zhao-blackbox-1-ngoma”>here.

Again, no time for purism: music both classic and new is represented, African Jazz, Rock, Soul, Disco, with a few electronic remix treatments – within the loose parameters of the various related styles comprising the “Afrobeat” constellation, the primary concern here is the dance floor.
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01 Fela Intro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
02 Kokolo – Late Night, Closed Eyes (White Mike Mix)
03 Umoja – Amou Baleke
04 Ogyatanaa Show Band – Disco Africa
05 Manu Dibango – Souk Fiesta
06 Ofege – Adieu
07 Oghene Kologbo – Na Yawa
08 Tony Allen – Get Together
09 Saravah – Soul Supersossego
10 Woima Collective – Marz
11 Mahmoud Ahmed – Bemen Sebeb Letlash (Ngoma Push Edit)
12 Soul Jazz Orchestra – Mugambi
13 Soul Jazz Orchestra – The Blind Leading the Blind
14 Ebo Taylor Jr. – Children Don’t Cry
15 Gabo Brown & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – It’s A Vanity
16 Antoine Dougbé & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – Ya Mi Ton
17 L. Barrabas – Tabou For The People (Sofrito Edit)
18 Candido – Jingo
19 Nacho Patrol – Africa Space Program (Ngoma Hardhouse Edit)
20 Jimi Tenor & Kabu Kabu – Global Party
21 Soul Ascendants – Tribute
22 Cesaria Evora – Nho Antone Escade
23 Manu Dibango – Ceddo End Title
24 Fela Outro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
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Afro Beets

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Afro Beets is the hottest new musical genre on the planet.

 

Just kidding, Afro Beets is not a genre. And neither is Afro Beats, the rather silly name coined by some UK radio dj to hype his show that seems to have stuck. What we really have here is Electronic Pop and Dance music from West Africa, specifically Hiplife and modern Highlife from Ghana, and Naija Jams from Nigeria (with a touch of Coupe Decale from the Ivory Coast and South African House for good measure).

The term “Afro Beats” has the most tenuous of links to its reference – Ice Prince has not much to do, musically, thematically, anything-cally, with Fela Kuti. About the only link between “Afro Beats” and the Afro-Funk/Soul/Rock of the 1970s, what is known as Afro Beat, is the same place of origin. While the differences are many: 70s Afro Beat was of course Funk and Blues based, while these new styles use beats related to Afro-House and Reggaeton, bass-lines from Highlife and Rumba, vocals a mix of local styles and Jamaican Dancehall and American R’n’B/Rap, with healthy doses of techno-rave energy. While 1970s Afrobeat often spread conscious political messages which passionately spoke of social realities and the struggle against oppression, these new forms of pop music deliver an entirely hedonistic message which passionately speak about glamour, escape, sex, and money.

Purist of both the musical and political variety, please let go of your seriousness and get with the serious boogie. To the “Drum Machines Have No Soul” type i say don’t forget that the 70s musicians you worship all embraced the latest technologies and sounds of their day. To people who take issue with the materialism this music espouses, from a dj thoroughly dedicated to anti-capitalism: dance music, with its anarchic celebration of pleasure and wanton disregard for the law, is always in essence, if not on the surface, anti-authoritarian; and partying, even in these bleak times, can still be an insurrectionary activity, disruptive of hum-drum consumerist routine.

But whatever. Love it or leave it. And whatever we call it, if it even is an “it”, the sweet grooves and irresistible hooks of this action packed music is not only the perfect summer party soundtrack, but simply the most uninhibited fun your money can buy, anywhere.

Though of course this download is free :)

P.S. Track 21, called Azonto Decale, is by the Focus Allstars, a pan-African musical force which grew out of the Focus Organization. If you are in London they do proper events (next one tomorrow Friday 21 of June): ymlp.com/ziZL7k

01 Artquake – Alanta Instrumental Intro
02 P-Square – Trowey!
03 J Martins ft. Fally Ipupa – Jupa Global Remix
04 Nhyiraba Kojo ft. Sammy – Baba God
05 Ghana Blast – Odwa (Raggao)
06 Obour ft. Morris She & Batman – Konkonti Baa
07 Unknown – Unknown
08 FBS ft. Tinny – Oldman Boogey Remix
09 Bradez & Ephraim – Ego Bee
10 X-Pensive Nframa – Aunty Adoley
11 Baby Jet – African Woman
12 Side 1 – One By One
13 Ruff n Smooth ft. S.K. Blinks – Azingele
14 Bigiano – Eyin’ Temi
15 Ephraim – Follow Follow
16 Stay J – Shashee Wowo (Kaxtro Remix)
17 D’banj – Oliver Twist
18 D’banj – Oliver Twist (Uhuru Remix)
19 Edem – Over Again
20 Joey B, Gary, and E.L. – Ice Cream Girl
21 Focus Allstars – Azonto Decale
22 P-Square – Danger
23 AQ – Wahala Dey
24 Sarkodie ft. E.L. – U Go Kill Me
25 Obumpa Rek, Austine B. Agaspa – U Go Kill Me Version
26 Olamide – First of All
27 Dr. Slim ft. Double – Seke (prod. by Eyoh Soundboy)
28 E.L. – Obuu Mo
29 Blaka – Tozo
30 E.L. ft. Appietus & Geelex – Bend Ya Body
31 Guru ft. Edja – Lapas Toyota
32 Guantoa – Asore Party
33 Double – Walai Talai
34 Unknown – K
35 Double 5.5 – Uhm Ahh
36 Dee Moneey – Kpokpo O Body
37 T.I.V. – Beremole
38 Lil Shaker – Pressure Sorrr
39 Kojo Antwi – Osebo

NGOMA 14 – DRUM

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This edition in the Ngoma Mix Series focuses on new 125 bpm African Electronic Dance Music.  As i have argued in the “Real Roots of Kwaito” piece for This Is Africa, American and European Disco, House, and Hiphop were crucially influential in the beginning stages of development of post-Apartheid South African urban music, but since then SA House and Kwaito have matured and grown into its own skin, much more an extension of indigenous rhythm cultures than related to “Western” dance music.  For example the beat patterns in these tracks are distinctly different: the constant off-beat high hats found in the US and Europe are almsot entirely absent; and with much more rich and developed rhythm elements and very different emphasis, this music should probably be thought of as simply new African dance music, with not much to do with what is traditionally known as “House” or “Techno” at all.  

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: ZIPPY OR MEDIAFIRE

Selections come mainly from South Africa and Angola, with lots of percussion, many balafons, a touch of jazz, some diasporic elements from Cuba and Colombia, couple tunes made in Spain, and a  shot of Nigerian Pop at the peak.  This is the first part, relatively bright in feel:  stay tuned for DRUM 2 – the dark side.

01 Dj Shimza & Cuebur Ft 340ml – Let The Sunshine (Reprise)
02 Invaders Of Africa – Impi Yamakhanda
03 Culoe De Song – Tsonga Song
04 Pro Tee – Thee Broken Keys
05 Dj Small Jon – Return Of the Drum
06 Black Motion feat. Nqobi  – Second Thoughts
07 Dr Ada T feat. Muzaic – Ewe
08 Jason Cheiron – Primal
09 Monocles, Slezz – Umba Kayo (Dj Alpha Kazu Dub)
10 Mbuandje – Mbuandja (Reprise) + Zozo – Totos Dance
11 Pablo Fierro – Agua (Nuevayorkquinas Mix)
12 Pablo Fierro – Sandulivi
13 Kosha Roots – Revival
14 Homeboyz Muzik – Samburu (Jungle Drums Original)
15 Dj Ad feat ZB E PJ – Patagoloza
16 Heavy K feat. Sarah Webster- The Gun Song (A Lesson Twice Learned Edit)
17 Lvovo – Original
18 3G Music – Vagabos
19 Pinto Dos Santos – Ma’e
20 Dj Kapiro & Mad Aksoul – Akanela (Oliver Twist Theme) + Estelle ft. D’banj – Oliver Twist (Remix)
21 Big Nuz – Rockafella
22 Franklin Rodriques – Para Na Wey
23 The Busy Twist – LDN Luanda
24 Dj Satellite & Dj Patrick – Malembe, Malembe
25 Boddhi Satva feat. Mangala Camara – Nankoumandjan (Dekalstrumental Mix)

Sonic Liberation Front

Made this for ultra cool international / art / architecture / concept / urbanism / fashion / music / design organization Platoon: United rhythms towards a borderless future: African House and European Acid, Hungarian Folk and Korean Pop, Cumbia Electro and Arabic Techno, Avant Jazz and Street Bass – international beats for dance floors and head space – against prejudice and xenophobia.  DOWNLOAD:  mediafire

2 new bangers

during the past month or so these recent mash edits have been dropped on unsuspecting dancers Germany to Johannesburg, every time followed by lots of jumping and screaming.

Burundi drums so ill…

more coming soon :)

this is of course the all time classic from Nigeria, fixed with some additional bass and treble – rocks a modern dance floor like nobody’s business.

NGOMA MIX 13 – Juju-Juke

Ever since drums were banned on most slave plantations in N. America during the 1600s, after the masters discovering that the slaves organized revolts with their talking drums, the expression of poly-rhythms in N. American popular music has primarily been through use of the voice.  This is the reason music in the US is typified by the simple 1-2 “dupple” rhythm, in contrast to more complex beat patterns in South-America or the Caribbean (which kept their drums).  Thus the evolution of all subsequent Afro-North-American music was profoundly shaped, from Blues to Funk to Disco:  kick on the 1, and snare on the 2; all the way down to the late 20th Century – complex poly-rhythms in hiphop is produced with rap, and the drums remain a skeletal, minimalistic boom-bap, as if just to mark time.

Now in the 21st Century a renewed sense of rhythmic complexity returns to  Afro-North-American dance music in the form of Juke/Footwork in Chicago: interlocking 2s and 3s form intricate beat structures, unmistakeably related to many forms of percussion styles in the motherland (but still often keeping that N. American hard snare on the 2).

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: SEPARATE TRACKS OR SINGLE TRACK

This NGOMA volume demonstrates this reconnection, after centuries of separation, between African tradition and Afro-Diaspora:  between Nigerian Juju/Fuji music and Chicago Juke/Footwork, between Ethiopian dance styles and Detroit Ghetto-Tech, between Iberian trad-modern street sounds and American R’n’B/Pop, between Afro-Punk and Club Music, between Congolese Mbira workouts and Hiphop, between Ghanaian and Senegalese drumming and Urban Bass Pressure.   Let us pump up the volume and remember the power and spirit of rhythm which survives every hardship, cruelty, and oppression, and rejoice in the timeless Music Of the Drums.

big thanks to Keith Jones for knowledge passing, Itzi Nallah, Sonic Diaspora and states side massive for making the Juju-Juke tour possible, my B-girls Jessi and Maya for support.Juju-Juke Tour kick off in Belgrade

I have played this set a few times now during the Serbia, Germany, and US East Coast tour  a few weeks ago, and crowds have gone completely BONKERS as the energy went straight through the roof: 500 screaming people and massive MOSH PIT at 3AM during Mikser Festival Belgrade; club crowd which refused to leave, clapping and hollering for 20 minutes after lights went up and sound was turned off at The Shrine Chicago.  I guess the world is more than ready for 160 BPM Afro-Footwork pressure!!!

and here is that adrenaline fueled misanthropic juke edit of South African punk rockers Koos by itself (download and drop into your set if you are wo/man enough :D):