MUTANT 05 Club Deconstruction

Dj Zhao - MUTANT5 - Club Deconstruction

(Jersey, London, Luanda)

“Transcendent beauty is possible during both the renaissance and golden-age of a culture, as it is during the decline of empire.” — Anonymous

The music here strongly emphasize abrupt cuts, stop-and-switch dynamics, which to me seems to reflect social fragmentation in urban life, and the often talked about compartmentalization of our experience of it into work/leisure/rest boxes. The music here is often tense, in my mind undoubtedly related to the pervasive class antagonism on the streets of NYC or London, and economic disparity which implements segregation. Violence is a constant theme: All of these new-ish music styles embody Gangsta Rap as much as Ghetto Tech, Booty Bass: pure sublimated aggression and commodified anger. The music here makes intensive use of manic repetition, often in a more radically rigid way than in traditional House or Techno, mirroring the reality of large sections of the underclasses, in whose culture this music is rooted, being locked into monotonous schedules of menial labor. So it is no surprise that *work* becomes a metaphor for the dance in Afro-American music, in a culture deeply shaped by both the historical legacy (No Drums Allowed) and present day reality of (wage) slavery.

Club Deconstruction represents fresh musical ideas in the “first world”, the former colonial centers, informed by recent internet enabled exposure to far away cultures (surely the only good effect of globalization). Track 5 – *Facta – Tungsten*, for instance, takes unmistakable rhythmic cues from Afro-House. While the periphery has always had access to Western culture (an effect of N. American cultural hegemony) – Kuduro from the Angolan ghettos has always assimilated the aesthetics of Techno and HipHop. Simultaneously, much of this music also draw on diasporic rhythm traditions in US and UK: Afro-Latin percussion on Track 03 – *Teeth – Black Thigh Shakes* is a good example.

Well that’s me breaking down this Mutant Club mix: 21st Century expressions of ancient rhythm heritage, shaped by colonial history, mirroring everyday realities of life, in the context of global capitalism.

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01 Deft – Thought You’d Fancy It (Fybe One Remix)
02 Millie & Andrea – GIF RIFF
03 Teeth – Black Thigh Shakes
04 Wiz Khalifa – Work (Myth Syzer Remix)
05 Facta feat. Hodge – Tungsten
06 Alex Coulton – Bounce
07 Alex Coulton – Tension
08 Bleszt – Rock Yo Body 2k14 (Uniqu3 feat. Mike Grip Remix)
09 Matrixxman – Procedure
10 Rushmore – Low Slung
11 Batu – Stairwells
12 NKC – Untitled
13 PE – On Top
14 Tessela – Let Up
15 NguzuNguzu – Break In
16 Distal – Green Lantern (Mike Q Remix)
17 SX – Woooo (Instrumental)
18 Mela Dee – CTRL X Goldfinch – Funky Steppa (Trusta Remix)
19 xxx¢ – Wooder X Wiley – Wot Do U Call It
20 Wiley – Donuts (Diamond Bass Remix)
21 Akkord – Typeface
22 Addison Groove – Keyhole
23 Mumdance feat. Novelist – Take Time
24 Detboi – Focus
25 Dark Sky – Confunktion
26 Low Steppa – Trackin
27 Flava D – New Era
28 BlackButter – What You Need
29 Brenmar feat. Uniique – Hey Ladies (Get Up)
30 Marfox – Lucky Punch
31 Limas do Swagg – Do Cotuvelo
32 Chicago Skyway – Air (95 Version)
33 Bráulio ZP – Xtraga
34 Dj Nedwyt-Fox – Inicio dos 100% Agressivos
35 Dar0 – Bora VIP X Pearson Sound – Deep Inside
36 SPMC – Declassified X Blue Daisy X Unknown Shapes
37 Gerkle – Lothario Steeze X Noms & Strooly – Richie Rich
38 Jordan Rakei – Add the Bassline (Evil Needle Remix)

MUTANT2 – 30 August

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Industrial nightmares and Shamanic visions collide in the club. Ancestral voices bleed through grids of the city. Diasporic sounds and mutant rhythms transformed by migrant movement, shaped by history. Fragmented Psychotropic Bass pulsating through the deepest valleys and highest crests of your mind, in the kaleidoscopic center of the omni-verse.  RSVP on fb

22 – 00: MUTANT CONFERENCE
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Like the panel last time with Dj Ripley and dj zhao, this time we are excited to bring you Stef Meaow, an anthropologist who has done extensive field work in Angola and Portugal, on the music we love to death called Kuduro. Also, Roi Rocky the Tropikal Camel will be addresing many strands of middle eastern music and culture and their socio-political meaning, from Israel to Palestine to Turkey to Kurdistan to Morrocco. Dj Zhao will be moderating and give some additional fun facts about the central cultural heritage of our species, rhythm, and how they can make the world a better place.

00 – END: MUSIC
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INTI CHE LIVE (Konn Recordings / Buenos Aires)

Intiche is well known by his Electro-Nativo music style, a fusion of electronic sounds: Tribal, Trance, Electro, Nu-Cumbia, Dub, and Native, taking you into the jungles, mountains and seas of sounds from south, central and north america.

TROPIKAL KAMEL LIVE (Future Roots / Jeruselem)

Middle Eastern and North African roots fused with 21st century Basstronics, creating a mixture between hypnotic rhythms, Arabic samples, and deep tribal atmosphere.

NGOMA SOUND ft. PHAROAH CHROMIUM LIVE
(Grautag Records / Ngoma / Palestine / Berlin

Mutoid mysticism, psychedelic ambiant, and anxious landscapes. Heat wave, half coma, intensity, and distant roots. Dusty landscape on the Terminal beach, shadows of dancers on the wall, snake charming computers, the Fata morgana become oil wells on fire.

DJ ZHAO (Ngoma / Beijing)

Born in Beijing and based in Berlin with a background in Sound Art and Avant Techno, Dj Zhao is an amateur musicologist and professional booty shaker, bringing the best contemporary and classic dance music together from wildly different times and places, focusing on Africa.

 

Exclusive Mix for Bomb Diggy

Bigup Bomb Diggy crew out in Amsterdam for inviting me to contribute to their mix series.

This one, a continuation from Northern Tropikal, takes us right up to the electro apocalyptic edge of the meaning of “tropical”; yet all selections, no matter how cold, synthetic, or mechanical, are driven by a prominent sense of polyrhythm, and use drum patterns derived from African percussive traditions. With a few Angolan tracks and a South African MC rounding off the mix with actual motherland sounds, Bombcast 19 seeks to express the musical and political feelings of this place (Europe) at this time, while pointing to a borderless bass future: at least 1 good thing we can all look forward to in the surely fucked up years to come.

01 Addison Groove – Minutes of Funk
02 Boddika, Joy Orbison & Pearson Sound – Faint
03 Hungry Man – Krang
04 Big Dope P – Let Me Flush Dat (Trrbo & Cat People Remix)
05 Chief Boima – Percolator
06 Untold – Anaconda
07 Untold – Bad Girls
08 LV – Zulu Computer ft. Okmalumkoolkat
09 UFO – Kiwi Mango
10 Late Que Eu Tô Passando feat. Gaiola Das Popozudas – Makossa Megablast
11 LV – Get a Grip feat. Mumdance
12 AJay D – Deep Magic
13 Dj Satellite – Bana Shilolo remix
14 Gazolina and Giovanni – Vou Te Insinar
15 T Williams – People’s Choice (F Dat Remix)
16 Major Notes – Ama Original
17 Salva – Yellobone
18 SMI – Not Ready (Instrumental)
19 Grenier – Vendetta
20 Martelo Vs Canblaster – Cannibal
21 Baobinga & ID feat. Shafique – Gun Talk
22 Dj Wilson – Noite Africana
23 Dj Wilson – Only The Beat
24 Dj Beleza – Lets Move Your Body
25 Buraka Som Sistema – Hangover (Swick Remix) (transition)
26 fr3e – I Got My Beads On (instrumental)
27 Green Money – Boomticka
28 Tickles – Call 4 Backup
29 Jusa Dementor – African Airhorn Dance
30 unknown – jjjjjjj
31 Cabo Snoop – Windeck (Arih Gold & Gil Perez Remix)
32 Cabo Snoop – Windeck

NGOMA 11 – Northern Tropikal

Rhythms born of the tropics grow up in colder urban climates:  A re-newed attention to percussion is appearing on the many different shores of Northern Hemisphere electronic dance music; as a new generation of artists in the US and Europe channel, re-interpret, and recontextualize Afro-diasporic drumming traditions according to their own local sensibilities, reaching to complete the mother continents’ circle of musical influence.

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DL: SEPARATE TRACKS OR SINGLE TRACK

In Detroit and Chicago intricate percussive patterns are growing right between the rigid 4-on-the-floor, snare-on-the-2 beat. Evolving directly from street level forms such as Ghetto-Tech and Booty-House, new drum sounds integrate with the cold and hard latices of industrialized assembly line structure – among others, the exceptional track by The Grizzl and J. Phlip is a perfect example.  interlocking microscopic beat segments by Afrikanized robot drummers are revitalizing increasingly impoverished styles like Hip Hop and Techno, machines under duress reaching new states of intensity.   Juke may be a freak mutation, a strange autistic grand child of Afrikan music with a mechanical brain and artificial limbs, and is itself giving birth to new hybrid styles both at home in the US and abroad (many of the tracks here fall in this one-step-removed category of Juke-inspired music).  Addison Groove brings streamlined house tempo footwork; while Chicago artists like Wheez-ie and Brenmar from the Movelt Posse come with their Juke inflected club music sometimes more informed by Afrikan urban music than anything from America – one listen to 28 – Bak it In or 16 – So High will convince you.

In Europe, the UK-Funky movement is in full swing, with its obviously Afro-Caribbean derived beat propelling the dance forward, represented here by mainstays  Roska and Doc Daneeka.  in Germany artists like Mode Selector, Dark Sky, and Schlachthofbronx are formulating their own Afro-Teutonic sonic worlds, sometimes reflecting the cold and sun-deprived climate of their homeland.   There are also micro strands of European producers making direct interpretations of Afrikan styles such as Angolan Kuduro, exemplified here by Diamond Bass and Portuguese artist Roulet.  Besides proponents working within genre delineations, there are many exploring unclassifiable areas between them.  For example UKG legends Bias and Gurley’s “Roll” remixed by Blackdown is a frankenstein monster borne of Garage and Juke, Sampology with the epic and all encompassing “Transatlantic Skanking Dub”, and Gremino and Baobinga & I.D.’s hard edged mutant Afro-Bass.

Northern Tropikal is either the lastest chapter of the continuing story of the original Afrikan pulse spreading, pollinating, multiplying, or “western” urban nomads accessing deep memories of Motherland rhythm heritage within the harsh reality of concrete jungles.  Which ever perspective you choose, one thing is clear:  Afrikanized Killer Beats are on the swarm.

01 Intro Feat. The Ill Saint
02 Bias & Gurley – Roll (Blackdown’s A Debt Repaid Remix)
03 Photek – U.F.O. (Addison Groove remix)
04 Addison Groove – Make Um Bounce
05 Dark Sky – The Lick
06 The Grizzl And J. Phlip – Bakupgrl
07 Modeselector – Art & Cash (Roska Remix)
08 Wireless Sound – Chicago
09 Lars Moston & Philipe de Boyar – So Sick (Douster Remix)
10 Randomer & Fife – No Sleep
11 Headhunter – Locus Lotus
12 Roska & Untold – Long Range
13 Diamond Bass – Stereotype
14 BD1982 – Calenture (Pacheko Remix)
15 Brenmar – At It Again
16 Brenmar – So High
17 AC Slater & Mumdance – Transatlantic Riddim (Instrumental)
18 Sampology – Transatlantic Skanking Dub
19 Doc Daneeka – Drums In the Deep
20 Pariah – The Slump + XXXY – Constant
21 Same Tiba – Barbie Weed + Onyenze – Onwa Nna Na Nwa – (Schlachthofbronx Remix)
22 Brenmar – Like It Like That
23 Dillon Francis – Westside
24 Onyenze – Onwa Nna Na Nwa – (Schlachthofbronx Remix)
25 Gremino – Ruffness
26 Baobinga & I.D. – Tongue Riddim
27 Addison Groove – This Is It + Berou & Canblaster – Kapongo Dance
28 Wheez-ie – Bak It In
29 Rusko – Cockney Thug (Buraka Som Sistema Remix) + Dj Assault – Ass ‘n’ titties
30 Buckfunk 3000 and Si Begg – High Volume (VIP Mix)
31 Makongo – Angolan Kung Fu (Dubbel Dutch Remix) + Dj Godfather I Keep Bangin The Beat
32 Roulet – Oasis
33 Scuba – Ruptured (Surgeon remix)
34 30Hz Mutate(d) (Pinch Re-work) / Outro Feat. The Ill Saint

RADIO NGOMA 1-8

the first 8 volumes in this Reboot.fm radio series.  for tracklisting please go to the soundcloud pages for each show.  to download of course simply click the downward aarow on the right side of the player for each show.

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before you listen and download: how much are these products worth to you?  if possible, please make a donation.

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RADIO NGOMA 1 – Live from Krakow

RADIO NGOMA 2 - Mid Tempo Trip Around the World

RADIO NGOMA 3 - Moody Booty

RADIO NGOMA 4 - Righteousness and Rudeness (Reggae Special)

RADIO NGOMA 5 - Ancestral Rhythms

RADIO NGOMA 6 - Afro Futurism

RADIO NGOMA 7 - Global Dub Resistance

RADIO NGOMA 8 - Trans-Atlantic Rhythm Passage


Chop Chop Akwaaba Supermix!

The super awesome and diverse Akwaaba asked me to do a mix to represent the first 2 years of their existence, and it was a challenge. The releases cover a wide range of both classic and modern sounds — how was i going to move from Malian roots to African Salsa to Kwaito, Hiplife, Afro-pop, Jazz, Funk, House and Kuduro? This is what i came up with. enjoy!

01 Baro – Ahmed Fofana
(from AKW001 VA – Akwaaba Wo Africa)
02 Alou Sangare Buranke – Kana Mine Mogo Kan Man
(from AKW006 Alou Sangare Buranke)
03 Mamou Sidibe – Noumou
(from AKW004 Mamou Sidibe – Djougouya)
04 Just a Band – Tingiza Kichwa
(from AKW015 Just a Band – 82)
05 Skeat – Basimanyana mamela Meroapa
(from AKW018 Skeat – Basimanyana Mamela Meroapa)
06 Iba Diabate – Sow
(from AKW013 Iba Diabate – Mouna)
07 Appietus – Ma Alomo (featuring KK Fosu & Reggie Zippy)
(from AKW020 Appietus – The Revolution)
08 Killamu – Vai Con Calma
(from AKW014 Killamu – A Minha Face)
09 Killamu – Não aceito, não
(from AKW014 Killamu – A Minha Face
10 Michel Pinheiro – Femme
(from AKW007 Michel Pinheiro – Agoh)
11 Bradez – One gallon
(from AKW001 Akwaaba Wo Africa
12 Quabena Philip – Wadaade Me
(from AKW002 VA – Move It Chaleh!)
13 Appietus the Revolution – Essabel (featuring Old Sodja & Mike)
(from AKW020 Appietus – The Revolution)
14 Ruff n Smooth – Swagger (feat. Stay Jay)
(from AKW023 Ruff’n’Smooth – Life Is Rough and Smooth)
15 Iba Diabate – Iba Nana
(from AKW013 Iba Diabate – Mouna)
16 Jali Bakary – Combination
(from AKW016 Jali Bakary Konteh Konteh Kunda)
17 Rabbi – Wedding
(from AKW002 VA – Move It Chaleh!)
18 Skeat – Dumelang
(from AKW018 Skeat – Basimanyana Mamela Meroapa)
19 DJ Djeff feat Maskarado – Elegom Bounsa
(from AKW024 DJ Djeff feat Maskarado – Elegom Bounsa)
20 Ruff n Smooth – Azingele feat. S.K. Blinks
(from AKW023 Ruff’n’Smooth – Life Is Rough and Smooth)
21 Killamu – Melodia De Semba
(from AKW014 Killamu – A Minha Face)
22 Killamu – Flaminguinho
(from AKW014 Killamu – A Minha Face)
23 Killamu – Yuya
(from AKW014 Killamu – A Minha Face)24 Killamu – Tchilu
25 Noite e Dia – Tiramakossa
(from AKW010 VA – Akwaaba Sem Transporte)
26 Just a Band – Kaa Ridho
(from AKW015 Just a Band – 82)
27 Jali Bakary – Kelefa
(from AKW016 Jali Bakary Konteh Konteh Kunda)

NGOMA MIX 7 – Hard Ass

Not sure what Kuduro means in the Kimbundu language of northern Angola, but its colorful translation in Portuguese is in some ways fitting of the music in both form and theme. Still, even though a lot of the music is hard, and a lot of the songs about fucking, the phrase is very much limited in describing the rich layers of word and sound, and becomes reductionist if taken only at face value. Kuduro can also be playful, humorous, soulful, emotional, ominous, scary, joyful, celebratory, and uplifting. It is also sonically adventurous in radical ways, fearless in its pushing and often destruction of dance music’s aesthetic boundaries, in ways often more bold and creative than sound-design obsessed electronic music from North America or Europe: from sweet accordions to reckless synths, from 8-bit game console palettes to near industrial noise, from samples distorted way beyond recognition to some of the deepest basslines in the world. And the vocals are just as wildly diverse: from “normal” singing to what sounds like children rapping to animalistic growling, grunting, yelling.

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: MEDIAFIRE

The many different flavors of Kuduro come from both its roots as well as later influence: mainly evolving from Batida rhythms (itself a fusion of African, Brazilian, and Caribbean traditions) of the 1980s, Kuduro has since branched out to sometimes incorporate elements from many other styles including Cape Verdean Funaná, Coupé-Décalé from France and the Ivory Coast, Afro-Brazilian percussion, Western Hiphop and Techno. A concise example of this melting of tradition, current club culture, and sonic experimentation might be track 28: Batida – Tribalismo Com Sacerdote, in which what sounds like distorted Mbiras (thumb piano) coexist with Angolan rap, furious rave energy and absolutely mental synth lines which verge on noise.

And speaking of Western Hiphop and Techno, this mix adopts quite a few Detroit Ghetto-Tech and Chicago Juke samples, to draw parallels between inner-city Afro-diaspora underground and African urban sound. Because, at least from where i’m standing, the Parallels are many: relentless and insistent focus on rhythm; use of repetition past the point of monotony in becoming pure abstraction; fast tempo and intensity pushing the dancefloor near breaking-point; gritty, raw, and unpolished sound; and finally, ruthless libidinal energy which defies any attempts at restraint.

Also, besides a few entirely unexpected and thrilling use of cultural pastiche in the songs themselves, there are 2 of my mashups here: track 16 which incorporates Indonesian Jaipong drums and track 35 which transforms the orchestral version of an old rave number we all know. Mostly consisting of both older and newer Kuduro from Angola, this mix also includes a few songs from Tanzania, Cote d’Ivoire, Cape Verde, and Brazil. I tried to avoid Western interpretations of Kuduro altogether, but 3 tunes feature non-African collaborating producers or remixers: their inclusion is testament of the strength of these tracks.

01 Dj Znobia – Ta Pio
02 DJ Ramatoulaye – Alhaji (Aladin Mix)
03 Helder, Rei do Kuduro – Felicidade
04 Unknown – Unknown (Helder Junior) (samples Dj Godfather)
05 King Wendu – Unknown
06 Directamente da Banda – Baza Baza
07 Project Winter – Progressividade
08 Dj Nedwyt Fox – Agora Nukutusula
09 Dj Clintonn – C Du Chahut
10 Dj Znobia – Kuduro em Musica
11 Dj Joca Moreno – Jogo de Cintura (samples Coon Daddy)
12 Dama S & Puto Stro – Pedrada Forte
13 Apanha Tudo – Bomban
14 Dj Jesus – Humbe, Humbe
15 Dj João Reis – N.B.A. – Instrumental (samples Dj Spinn & Dj Rashad)
16 Master of Jaipong VS. DJ Amorim – Drum and Bass
17 Dj kito – Da Cara (samples Dj Rashad)
18 Zakee Kuduro & Buraka Som Sistema – New Africa (samples Dj Rashad)
19 Tinox – Sans Gueber
20 Dj Amorim – In The Rush Hour
21 Nervoso – House Diney (interlude samples Dj Assault and Ol’ Dirty Bastard)
22 Dj Djeff feat Maskarado – Elegom Bounsa VS. Dj V.R. – Batida Tchapu
23 Dj Jesus – Crazy Love
24 Dj Znobia – Eue
25 Lucky Gomes – Patiri
26 Puto Cossa – Vem Live feat. Dj Nedwyt Fox
27 Dj V.R. – Batida Tchapu (reprise) / Dama Pancha – Zum zum zum
28 Batida – Tribalismo Com Sacerdote
29 Dj miki – Dmc Caps Mix 2 (samples Kill Frenzy)
30 Katinga MC – Alegoria remix (samples A Lost People)
31 Dj Amorim – Os Angolanos
32 Figura – Ze Bula (Sabbo Remix)
33 Dj Ivan LLuv – Let’s Go
34 Unknown – Unknown (Follow Me)
35 Dj Kadu – Catelita VS. KLF and The Williams Fairey Brass Band – What Time Is Love
36 Ize’ feat. Anofela – Cape Decale
37 Schlachthofbronx – Farafina feat. Ete Kelly
38 Ize’ – Nhaku d’home
39 Unknown – Unknown (outro)

NGOMA MIX 6 – Ukulwa

(as featured on Gen Bass and The Fader)

Framing house music, perhaps the most depoliticized of all urban musics, whose narrative revolve around unreflective pleasure seeking, in a political context may seem incredulous to some. Yet this incredulity would be based on a superficial reading of the essence of house music culture, despite what it has become in the commercial sphere: in its very inception, the escapism into a fantasy hedonistic world was an expression of the underprivileged and marginalized, and the creation of a sanctuary of acceptance was nothing less than a political act of the oppressed and discriminated against.

STREAM: MIXCLOUD // DOWNLOAD SINGLE TRACK: MEDIAFIRE

Perhaps even more than Chicago or Detriot 67, the political dimension is deeply interwoven into the urban musical fabric of South Africa, and has profoundly influenced its evolution. Zulu protest songs live on through Kwaito, the first musical expression of a free South Africa, and from there the current House culture developed: if less overtly rebellious, it nonetheless retains in its beats and voices the spirit of revolt: the urgent and passionate expression of a people who have been subjugated for too long.

The Zulu word Ukulwa means war and struggle. and in this context it can only mean a war against oppression and the struggle for freedom and independence. Apartheid may have officially ended, but its myriad effects can be unmistakably felt in a slew of social problems which plague the nation today, from crime to domestic violence as result of the break up of families, from poverty to various hardships which come from an entire generation having been systematically deprived of formal education. Thus even while many positive things are taking place, as South Africa is surely rising as a proud modern nation, even as we rejoice in these blissful rhythms, we must remember this war, and both continue, and continue to be inspired by, this struggle against domination, against injustice: Ukulwa.

NGOMA MIX 2

The drum comes from Africa, and also techno. Here is an extremely simplified version of the lineage: slave songs – blues – gospel – jazz – funk – disco – house – techno —- the circle is complete. After all, the 4 on the floor hypnotic groove can be found in the myriad styles of African music from every era. House and techno grew up in the northern hemisphere, acquiring a character a bit removed from the rich rhythmic traditions of the mother continent. But in recent decades electronic dance music has been developing in Africa, and a new wave of club music is blossoming and flourishing.

OR: STREAM:  MIXCLOUD // SEPARATE TRACKS DL: MEDIAFIRE

History was made in 2008 with Warp Records’ release of DJ Mujava’s Township Funk in Europe, and the world is slowly coming to grips with the awesome power of African electronic music. Motherland house and techno is spreading far and wide, forming the rhythmic basis for urban bass music in the UK and elsewhere: Africanized Killer Beats on the swarm!