NGOMA Classic 2 – AfroBeat

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Since Fela’s voice is much cooler than mine, i have switched out my intro with his, and this mix originally made to promote BlackBox number 1 has grown into a proper NGOMA release – with a few changes and much new goodness including 2 wicked special edits – one of the Ethio classic by Mahmoud Ahmed (following a funktastic number by Berlin’s own Woima Collective), and another of a very unique cosmic disco track by the techno head Lego Welt’s Afrocentric alter ego Nacho Patrol. Old version of this mix can still be heard Rebootfm – 11-dj-zhao-blackbox-1-ngoma”>here.

Again, no time for purism: music both classic and new is represented, African Jazz, Rock, Soul, Disco, with a few electronic remix treatments – within the loose parameters of the various related styles comprising the “Afrobeat” constellation, the primary concern here is the dance floor.
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01 Fela Intro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
02 Kokolo – Late Night, Closed Eyes (White Mike Mix)
03 Umoja – Amou Baleke
04 Ogyatanaa Show Band – Disco Africa
05 Manu Dibango – Souk Fiesta
06 Ofege – Adieu
07 Oghene Kologbo – Na Yawa
08 Tony Allen – Get Together
09 Saravah – Soul Supersossego
10 Woima Collective – Marz
11 Mahmoud Ahmed – Bemen Sebeb Letlash (Ngoma Push Edit)
12 Soul Jazz Orchestra – Mugambi
13 Soul Jazz Orchestra – The Blind Leading the Blind
14 Ebo Taylor Jr. – Children Don’t Cry
15 Gabo Brown & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – It’s A Vanity
16 Antoine Dougbé & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – Ya Mi Ton
17 L. Barrabas – Tabou For The People (Sofrito Edit)
18 Candido – Jingo
19 Nacho Patrol – Africa Space Program (Ngoma Hardhouse Edit)
20 Jimi Tenor & Kabu Kabu – Global Party
21 Soul Ascendants – Tribute
22 Cesaria Evora – Nho Antone Escade
23 Manu Dibango – Ceddo End Title
24 Fela Outro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
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FUSION 7 – A.F.R.O.

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“The drum is closely linked in African philosophy with the word… The original utterance which created life of nothingness and chaos, and then established order in that creation. The drum is therefore a divine tool of the Supreme Being, a womb or beginning of created life.”  – Maureen Warner-Lewis

“The drum encloses a womb of space in which silence and identity will emerge out of the darkness and the void.” – Wilson Harris

“”God is dumb, until the drum speaks.” – Ancient African proverb

Drawing upon the vast rhythmic resources across the mother continent, from places like Botswana, Burundi, Uganda, Ghana, Congo, Morocco, and more, with a touch of Afro-Cuba and the Afro-Caribbean, as well as selection and sampling of some of the great electronic music of today, FUSION 7 builds a fortress to dance, a bridge between today’s electronic dance music and its roots on the Mother Continent.  Even more than the Afro-Asian House of FUSION 3 and Middle Eastern Bass of FUSION 4, this 7th volume of pure African Percussion and Techno/Bass is firmly situated on the dance floor.

As we take synthetic drugs in the context of today’s commercialized club culture, it is important to know that dance music is neither frivolous or inconsequential:  rhythm was important for the evolutionary process of our species in terms of motor functions and socialization, and dancing is a sacred activity which connects us both to each other, as well as to the vibrations of the heavenly spheres.

01 Heart Beat Intro / Tuareg Traditional X dima – monolog
02 Guem & Zaka – Printemps X Yonurican – Lucha Machete
03 El Hadj Ensemble – Wo Mawu X Fast Vision Soul – Babatunde
04 Soweto Ensemble – Nxal X Unknown
05 Bukky Leo & Black Egypt – Black Egypt
06 Gordeon Odametey – Okemi Ekpe X Queen Atom – Minsk
07 Kasai Allstars – Mukuba Special X Shakleton X Wiley – Where’s My Brother (Trebus    Funky Dub)
08 Moritz Von Oswald Trio – Pattern 3 X MicroTribe
09 Afronaut – Neuvo Rumbero X Echologist feat. The Space Ape – Mercy Beat (MRI vs Uess Nondub Remix)
10 Calypso Jazz Improvisation With Steel Drums X Caja De Ritmos – Drumstep X          Echologist feat. The Space Ape – Mercy Beat (MRI vs Uess Nondub Remix)
11 Shackleton – It’s Not Easy X Rhythmic Theory – Riveted
12 Percussion3 X Kamikaze Space Programme – Lawn (Dj Zhao Short Edit)
13 Guem & Zaka – Turon X Roska – Jackpot
14 Tambours Du Burundi – Uri Inyambo Burundi + LR Groove – Bush Man
15 Guem – Topil X Gender – Behind the Forest
16 Hammana Manden Kono A Nakan X Edu K – Avec Bon Bons
17 El Hadj Ensemble – Wo Mawu X Cabo Snoop – Windeck (Arih Gold & Gil Perez Remix)
18 Guem & Zaka – Liberte X BWG – Mandombanzani
19 Guem & Zaka – Liberte X Ventress – Typhon
20 Tuareg Traditional X Ardisson – The End (Posthuman Remix) X Ventress – Typhon / Heartbeat

Afro Beets

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Afro Beets is the hottest new musical genre on the planet.

 

Just kidding, Afro Beets is not a genre. And neither is Afro Beats, the rather silly name coined by some UK radio dj to hype his show that seems to have stuck. What we really have here is Electronic Pop and Dance music from West Africa, specifically Hiplife and modern Highlife from Ghana, and Naija Jams from Nigeria (with a touch of Coupe Decale from the Ivory Coast and South African House for good measure).

The term “Afro Beats” has the most tenuous of links to its reference – Ice Prince has not much to do, musically, thematically, anything-cally, with Fela Kuti. About the only link between “Afro Beats” and the Afro-Funk/Soul/Rock of the 1970s, what is known as Afro Beat, is the same place of origin. While the differences are many: 70s Afro Beat was of course Funk and Blues based, while these new styles use beats related to Afro-House and Reggaeton, bass-lines from Highlife and Rumba, vocals a mix of local styles and Jamaican Dancehall and American R’n’B/Rap, with healthy doses of techno-rave energy. While 1970s Afrobeat often spread conscious political messages which passionately spoke of social realities and the struggle against oppression, these new forms of pop music deliver an entirely hedonistic message which passionately speak about glamour, escape, sex, and money.

Purist of both the musical and political variety, please let go of your seriousness and get with the serious boogie. To the “Drum Machines Have No Soul” type i say don’t forget that the 70s musicians you worship all embraced the latest technologies and sounds of their day. To people who take issue with the materialism this music espouses, from a dj thoroughly dedicated to anti-capitalism: dance music, with its anarchic celebration of pleasure and wanton disregard for the law, is always in essence, if not on the surface, anti-authoritarian; and partying, even in these bleak times, can still be an insurrectionary activity, disruptive of hum-drum consumerist routine.

But whatever. Love it or leave it. And whatever we call it, if it even is an “it”, the sweet grooves and irresistible hooks of this action packed music is not only the perfect summer party soundtrack, but simply the most uninhibited fun your money can buy, anywhere.

Though of course this download is free :)

P.S. Track 21, called Azonto Decale, is by the Focus Allstars, a pan-African musical force which grew out of the Focus Organization. If you are in London they do proper events (next one tomorrow Friday 21 of June): ymlp.com/ziZL7k

01 Artquake – Alanta Instrumental Intro
02 P-Square – Trowey!
03 J Martins ft. Fally Ipupa – Jupa Global Remix
04 Nhyiraba Kojo ft. Sammy – Baba God
05 Ghana Blast – Odwa (Raggao)
06 Obour ft. Morris She & Batman – Konkonti Baa
07 Unknown – Unknown
08 FBS ft. Tinny – Oldman Boogey Remix
09 Bradez & Ephraim – Ego Bee
10 X-Pensive Nframa – Aunty Adoley
11 Baby Jet – African Woman
12 Side 1 – One By One
13 Ruff n Smooth ft. S.K. Blinks – Azingele
14 Bigiano – Eyin’ Temi
15 Ephraim – Follow Follow
16 Stay J – Shashee Wowo (Kaxtro Remix)
17 D’banj – Oliver Twist
18 D’banj – Oliver Twist (Uhuru Remix)
19 Edem – Over Again
20 Joey B, Gary, and E.L. – Ice Cream Girl
21 Focus Allstars – Azonto Decale
22 P-Square – Danger
23 AQ – Wahala Dey
24 Sarkodie ft. E.L. – U Go Kill Me
25 Obumpa Rek, Austine B. Agaspa – U Go Kill Me Version
26 Olamide – First of All
27 Dr. Slim ft. Double – Seke (prod. by Eyoh Soundboy)
28 E.L. – Obuu Mo
29 Blaka – Tozo
30 E.L. ft. Appietus & Geelex – Bend Ya Body
31 Guru ft. Edja – Lapas Toyota
32 Guantoa – Asore Party
33 Double – Walai Talai
34 Unknown – K
35 Double 5.5 – Uhm Ahh
36 Dee Moneey – Kpokpo O Body
37 T.I.V. – Beremole
38 Lil Shaker – Pressure Sorrr
39 Kojo Antwi – Osebo

Sonic Liberation Front

Made this for ultra cool international / art / architecture / concept / urbanism / fashion / music / design organization Platoon: United rhythms towards a borderless future: African House and European Acid, Hungarian Folk and Korean Pop, Cumbia Electro and Arabic Techno, Avant Jazz and Street Bass – international beats for dance floors and head space – against prejudice and xenophobia.  DOWNLOAD:  mediafire

sorry for lateness:  dropping beats for Ghanaian superstars Kwaw Kese, Bradez, and Appietus tonight at Worldtronics.  first time ever Hiplife concert/party in Berlin?  in Europe???

addendum:  biggest regret of 2011 was not taking any photos with Appietus, Bradez, and Kwaw Kese while hanging out back stage.  but we do have concert video, just need to find time to edit…