MUTANT5 Club Deconstruction

Dj Zhao - MUTANT5 - Club Deconstruction

(Jersey, London, Luanda)

“Transcendent beauty is possible during both the renaissance and golden-age of a culture, as it is during the decline of empire.” — Anonymous

The music here strongly emphasize abrupt cuts, stop-and-switch dynamics, which to me seems to reflect social fragmentation in urban life, and the often talked about compartmentalization of our experience of it into work/leisure/rest boxes. The music here is often tense, in my mind undoubtedly related to the pervasive class antagonism on the streets of NYC or London, and economic disparity which implements segregation. Violence is a constant theme: All of these new-ish music styles embody Gangsta Rap as much as Ghetto Tech, Booty Bass: pure sublimated aggression and commodified anger. The music here makes intensive use of manic repetition, often in a more radically rigid way than in traditional House or Techno, mirroring the reality of large sections of the underclasses, in whose culture this music is rooted, being locked into monotonous schedules of menial labor. So it is no surprise that *work* becomes a metaphor for the dance in Afro-American music, in a culture deeply shaped by both the historical legacy (No Drums Allowed) and present day reality of (wage) slavery.

Club Deconstruction represents fresh musical ideas in the “first world”, the former colonial centers, informed by recent internet enabled exposure to far away cultures (surely the only good effect of globalization). Track 5 – *Facta – Tungsten*, for instance, takes unmistakable rhythmic cues from Afro-House. While the periphery has always had access to Western culture (an effect of N. American cultural hegemony) – Kuduro from the Angolan ghettos has always assimilated the aesthetics of Techno and HipHop. Simultaneously, much of this music also draw on diasporic rhythm traditions in US and UK: Afro-Latin percussion on Track 03 – *Teeth – Black Thigh Shakes* is a good example.

Well that’s me breaking down this Mutant Club mix: 21st Century expressions of ancient rhythm heritage, shaped by colonial history, mirroring everyday realities of life, in the context of global capitalism.

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01 Deft – Thought You’d Fancy It (Fybe One Remix)
02 Millie & Andrea – GIF RIFF
03 Teeth – Black Thigh Shakes
04 Wiz Khalifa – Work (Myth Syzer Remix)
05 Facta feat. Hodge – Tungsten
06 Alex Coulton – Bounce
07 Alex Coulton – Tension
08 Bleszt – Rock Yo Body 2k14 (Uniqu3 feat. Mike Grip Remix)
09 Matrixxman – Procedure
10 Rushmore – Low Slung
11 Batu – Stairwells
12 NKC – Untitled
13 PE – On Top
14 Tessela – Let Up
15 NguzuNguzu – Break In
16 Distal – Green Lantern (Mike Q Remix)
17 SX – Woooo (Instrumental)
18 Mela Dee – CTRL X Goldfinch – Funky Steppa (Trusta Remix)
19 xxx¢ – Wooder X Wiley – Wot Do U Call It
20 Wiley – Donuts (Diamond Bass Remix)
21 Akkord – Typeface
22 Addison Groove – Keyhole
23 Mumdance feat. Novelist – Take Time
24 Detboi – Focus
25 Dark Sky – Confunktion
26 Low Steppa – Trackin
27 Flava D – New Era
28 BlackButter – What You Need
29 Brenmar feat. Uniique – Hey Ladies (Get Up)
30 Marfox – Lucky Punch
31 Limas do Swagg – Do Cotuvelo
32 Chicago Skyway – Air (95 Version)
33 Bráulio ZP – Xtraga
34 Dj Nedwyt-Fox – Inicio dos 100% Agressivos
35 Dar0 – Bora VIP X Pearson Sound – Deep Inside
36 SPMC – Declassified X Blue Daisy X Unknown Shapes
37 Gerkle – Lothario Steeze X Noms & Strooly – Richie Rich
38 Jordan Rakei – Add the Bassline (Evil Needle Remix)

MUTANT 4 – Meta House

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Evil twin of the last MUTANT mix of brightly hued, sun-kissed club music for endless summer nights, Meta House is heavy, narcotic. Including lots of deep techy tracks, some jacking, bassline, healthy dose of ghetto, a touch of shuffling, and material which may be in the category of “House Not House” — but as abstract or bassy as any part of it may be, i made sure that all selections are primarily, unmistakably House – all steady kicks and offbeat hi-hats.

01 Kowton – EFX01 X R.I.P AJ
02 Altered Natives – Die 4 U
03 Boddika – Steam
04 Rommek – Puffin Original
05 Thomas Meinecke & Move D – Work Me (That’s Fierce)
06 Altered Natives – Shake That feat. E.S.P.
07 Gage – Burnin
08 Boddika & Joy Orbison – Tricky’s Team
09 Rushmore – Jumpshot
10 Matrixxman – Stop It (Original Mix)
11 Randee Jean – You Got It (Dexter & Awanto 3 Mix 2)
12 Altered Natives – Friends & Lovers
13 Tom Flynn – Mr. Hedgehog
14 Kill Frenzy – Booty Clap
15 Joy Orbison, Boddika & Pearson Sound – Nil (Reece)
16 Kris Wadsworth – Mainline
17 PulseCode – Get Large
18 INdigo – Aradia
19 Dark Sky – Ruk
20 Effy – The Look
21 Boddika – Warehouse
22 Braiden – The Alps
23 Omar S – Kosmos 1402 X Nina Kraviz – I’m Gonna Get You
24 Omar S – Income Tax Refund Dance

MUTANT 3 – In the House

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MUTANT 3 is about euphoric and summery, purely pleasurable, feel good electronic music from North America and Europe.

Encompassing classic Chicago, Deep, Acid and Tribal House as well as new-school French and UK styles, going beyond House into Bass and Garage territory with even a touch of pop. Alternately euphoric, somber, psychedelic, whimsical and sexy, This mix is the soundtrack for summer in the city.

Ngoma massive world wide need not worry, there are plenty of drums in these “Western” grooves, and plenty of Africa in the machine. To be honest it was difficult keeping all the ghetto, bassline, even more percussion driven, and crazy ill tribal jacking shit out of this — coming up next.

01 Omar S – j-a-i-p-u-r / Tony Allen – Ole (Moritz Von Oswald Remix)
02 The Zohar – Dog Day
03 Dj Qu – Party People Clap (Dj Jus Ed Remix)
04 Omar S – Here’s Your Trance Now Dance (Shadow Ray Remix)
05 Jus Ed – Down & Dirty
06 Spoonz – High In Chicago
07 Robert Hood – Motor City
08 Tin Man – S_MPL HOUSE
09 The Early Sound Collective – MS3
10 Medicis & Vanshift – Minneapolis
11 Generation Next – Full of Life
12 Simple & Thigpen – Licking
13 Percussions – KHLHI
14 Mia Dora – Jezebel
15 Dense & Pika – Crispy Duck
16 Mosca – Bax
17 Tom Zanetti – Darlin X Flight Facilities (ft. Giselle Rosselli) – Crave You (WtchDctr Remix)
18 Ossie – Tarantula
19 Octo Octa – Through The Haze
20 Ryan Wells – Dimes
21 Myrryrs – Blood of a Slave (CEDAA Remix)
22 Wiley – Skanking (The 2-Bears Remix)
23 Simon Off – Want U
24 Yosa – Desmond
25 New Devices – Everything Good (Juan Kidd and Corey Remix)
26 Martyn – Newspeak
27 Bombe – Eclipse
28 Braille – Rise
29 Walton – Every Night
30 Spoonz – 97

JUJUJUKE2 – JUJULIFE

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From Soweto to Chicago, from Jakarta to Paris,
from Lagos to London, from Conakry to Berlin.

01 Tshetsha Boys – Tsekeleke Instrumental X Traxman – Geto Djz
02 Tshetsha Boys – Hi Lavaya X Dj Rashad – Get Down On the Floor
03 Thug Entrancer – Death After Life X Ground Mass Lyer – Syncopate
04 LiL JaBBa – CoLLiSioN
05 Sonido Berzerk – Blitz
06 M’bemba Bangoura – Kirin X 101 Juke
07 Le Motel – 45º34º50º – Pygmy Juke
08 Digi – Trwick
09 Digi – Black Therapy
10 Batåk – Alu-Alu Tu Mula Jadi Na Bolon X Dj Roc – Drop My Back
11 Baglady – Rockoff (Bigote Remix) X Vtgnike – Hi Fashion
12 Jumping Back Slash – Number One Big Big
13 Le Motel – 45º34º50º – Right Business
14 Ital Tek – Ultra
15 Cedaa – Zoom
16 Kode 9 – Xingfu Lu
17 Subp Yao – Dat Thing
18 Romare – I wanna Go (Turn Back)
19 Blind prophet – Ease Up (Original Mix)
20 Radar Bird – 3 O’Clock
21 Romare – Your Love (You Give Me Fever)
22 Naked Werewolf – #TheFangs
23 Dj Rashad – Deep Inside
24 Flo Rida – Get Low (Juked by Dj Nehpets)
25 EQ Why – Ghetto Booty 773 (Original Mix)
26 Dj Spinn – Fall Back
27 Tiyiselani Vomaseve – Se Naxaniseka X Dj Rashad – Hands In the Air
28 Mister Ries – The Near Future
29 Dj Rashad, MoonDoctoR & FreshtillDef – Ethno
30 Doctor Jeep – Golden Eye (Original Mix)
31 Sorie Kondi – Yalimamy
32 George Maluleke – Rioheli

MUTANT 2 – Drum’n’Bass

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In the late 1940s and 1950s the first wave of Afro-Caribbean immigrants, many of them ex-servicemen who fought, bled, and watched their friends die during WW2 for the UK, landed with their families in London. During that first winter bricks were thrown into their windows (often in bags containing shit), their homes were attacked, and there were regular assaults on their children. When the situation got really bad, they tore up bed sheets to use as bandages, used kitchen knives and broken furniture as weapons, to defend their homes and loves ones. But when these loyal colonial subjects fought back they became the primary criminals in the eyes of the police: regularly mistreated, unjustly punished, and even framed for crimes they did not commit. This is the kind of injustice and abuse faced by black people in England ever since, all the way to today’s discrimination and structural economic inequality.

These Jamaicans and Trinidadians played the music of their homeland at house parties and later in community centers which became night clubs. Events would be continually interrupted by the police, young party goers continually harassed and arrested, and the community centers would often get permanently shut down. Under these conditions, Afro-Caribbean sounds and musical sensibilities not only survived in the UK, but thrived and formed the foundation of much modern British music.

Afro-Caribbean rhythm traditions took root and spread all over England, with crucial, lasting influence: from Reggae-Rock such as the Clash and Bauhaus, to the dub infused urban electronic mutations of Garage, Dubstep, UK Funky, and of course, Jungle and Drum’n’Bass.

And these Afro-Caribbean roots are once again coming to the foreground, after almost 20 years of Drum’n’Bass history, in which much of the music was sadly ruined by fist pumping broification, the boring and repetitive testosterone of 16 year olds on crank. But now, tracks with the skeletal rhythm of 90s hard Ragga Dancehall, as well as all kinds of Africanized percussive elements, typify the NEW “new-school”, where Liquid and Neurofunk combines with the best bits of Metalheads, Jump Up, and many past styles.

Let us remember the process of struggle and legacy of conflict from which it comes, as we revel in the latest permutation of this MUTANT culture.

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01 Seefeel – Ashdecon
02 Sub – history
03 Sub – Alpha
04 Genotype – Further Searching
05 ASC – TMA-1
06 Rockwell – Tribes
07 J Kenzo – One Drop
08 OM – Jaguar
09 Moresounds – Flocon (House Of Black Lanterns Remix)
10 Distal – Nose Candy
11 Dub Phizix – Yukon X Peter Tosh X Charlie Dark – The Road
12 Alix Perez feat. Riko Dan – Warlord
13 Consequence – 11 Circles
14 Loxy & Resound – Vertigo
15 Unknown artist – i.kk.eee.kkk.h.l.iii.ll.ee.lll.ddd.m.c.mm.fff.mmm.ddd.n.e.
16 Fracture – Gangbusters
17 Kryptic Minds – Burnt to Ashes
18 dBridge – A Lost Cause
19 Code 3 – Chasm
20 Alix Perez – Menacing Ways X Derrik and Tonika – Taipan
21 ASC – MOdular Concepts
22 Alix Perez – 808
23 Paradox – Paralexia
24 Ulterior Motive and Jubei – Snore Tooth
25 dBridge – Mourning Dawn
26 Zero T – Tavistoc Dub
27 dBridge & Skeptical – Move Way
28 Dabs feat. MC Kwality – Skull + Bones (Sam Binga Remix)
29 FFF – Dreamstate
30 Carvar and Clock – Miskatonik X Anonymous
31 Lorn – Tomorrow
32 Koto – Endgame
33 Seefeel – Utreat (Complete)
34 Machinefabriek – The Breaking Water X Chris Hedges

Middle Beast

_MIDDLEBEAST2A journey worthy of Hassan’s assassins: Sufi Bass, Islamic Electro, MidEastern Jazz, North Afrikan Drums, Arabic Acid for dance floor murder.

01 Muslimgauze – Basra X Hossam Ramzy – Rhythms of the Nile
02 Rikslyd – Oriented
03 B-Line Brother – Souk Nationala X Maxmillion Dunbar – Casette Arabic
04 Funkineven ft. Fatima – Phoneline (Dauwd Edit) X Muslimgauze – Tuareg
05 Muslimgauze – Pale Elegant Egyptian
04 Unit Moebius – Neutral Mix
05 Hossam Ramzy – Cobra’s Dance (Fallahi Rhythm) X LV – DL Instrumental
06 Kosta Kostov – Mas Gnawa feat. MMbeki and MarcoT (Moroka Remix) X Hossam Ramzy – Rhythms of the Nile X Unknown Bellydance
07 I-Cube – Le Bon Vieux Temps
08 Acid Arab – Theme
09 Omar Souleyman – Nahy (mps PILOT Tweak)
10 Omar Souleyman – – Hefer Gabrak Bidi X Omar Souleyman – Shift Almani (Crackboy Remix)
11 Armando – 151 (Acid Arab Edit)
12 Unknown – Kiewie (Bubbling)
13 Unknown – Who’s the Paki
14 Dj Figo – Unknown
15 Uncertain X Siebert rey – Basem Triomania
16 El Diwan De Las Poetisas X Uncle Bakongo – Makonde
17 Moriphon 07 X Ill Blu – Dragon Pop
18 Muslimgauze – In The Bazaars Of Srinagar, Chuddar Clad Women Speak of Foreigner In Their Midst) X Takaaki Itoh – Slicer (Sleeparchive Remix1)
19 Muslimgauze – Bourj El Barajneh X Clapz II Dogz – Ripgroove
20 Fatima Al Qadiri – Oil Well

MUTANT 1 – Africanized Techno

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bigup Afropop Worldwide for commissioning this piece.

Most definitely not for the faint of heart, made with Berlin’s Berghain Club in mind, this one needs the best sound system you have access to (preferably a Function One), as well as very loud volumes.

“Percussion music is a contemporary transition from melody driven music (of the European tradition) to the all-sound music of the future.” – John Cage

Techno, an umbrella term for various styles of electronic music, can be characterized by an eschewing of narrative song structure and melodic content to focus on repetitive machine beats, usually with a steady 4/4 kick drum, snares on the 2, and a compulsive high hat in between.

A culture of mechanical anonymity and electronic universality, Techno purportedly embodies values from a post-human future, cut off entirely from the mess of our collective past. But reality of the music is the opposite: it came out of specific histories and locations, and is a direct product of both the 20th Century as well as much older rhythmic traditions from the mother continent.

Similar to older Afro-American styles like House, Disco, Funk, Soul, Motown, Rock, and Blues, the 4 on the floor beat emblematic of most techno is a good example of the duple rhythm, which became popular in America (and the world) from the legacy of slaves playing African percussion music without drums, with influence from European folk music. Fast forward to the 1980s, Africa Bambataa meeting Kraftwerk was a new chapter of fusion, and produced new strains of African rhythm mutation under new and specific circumstances. The simplicity of the 4/4 duple rhythm and machine sounds spoke to new generations raised in urban industrial settings, and part of its wide international appeal.

But in Techno African rhythm traditions survive and thrive, in mutant form, re-imagined and reconstructed based on earlier re-imagination and reconstructions. The brightest minds in modern electronic music have all made use of specifically African musical ideas and rhythm sensibilities, and IMHO, the best Techno is polyrhythmic, a reduced and streamlined version of African percussion. The music of the genre’s most important innovators often includes off-kilter syncopation, beats falling not squarely on the grid, as well as different interlocking rhythms playing at the same tempo, such as 3/4 with 4/4. Often subtle in its interaction with the dominant duple beat, these percussive elements and dynamics are expressive of complex rhythmic sensibilities which are, if indirectly, unmistakably related to African traditions. Today it is no different, many of the brightest minds are making the deepest, hardest, most forward thinking and uncompromising underground Techno with, consciously or unconsciously, African rhythm ideas in mind. Synthesizers play the part of Djembes, bleeps and blurps are drum accents: the African-ness of these beat patterns may be more obvious to me and others who spend a lot of time with African music, but I think will also become apparent to anyone who has an open mind and really listen.

If dance music itself can be defined as the design of sound patterns according to, and for, the proportions and speeds of the human body – African traditions have had many tens or even hundreds of thousands of years to perfect exactly this. Techno is often said to be about “functionality” on the dance floor – for this reason it makes sense that the evolution of new dance music should increasingly look to Africa for inspiration.

This mix was made to demonstrate all of this, including legends like Underground Resistance and Jeff Mills, as well as later and present day innovators such as Surgeon, Ancient Methods, Redshape, Peter Van Hoeson, etc, with a sprinkling of samples from field recordings and traditional music from Africa. (It would have been too easy to include UK Funky and other kinds of new bass music, which are often even more explicitly Africanized, so I am keeping this one mostly genre specific.)

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just in:  the good people at Berghain also wants to hear this in the space for which it was intended:  come hear an extended version of this set on 7th of March, with Untold and 2564.

NGOMA 17 – Cumbiatronic

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Very excited to bring you this long time coming Neuvo/Electro/Bass Cumbia mix, about time i showed solidarity with all my South American sisters and brothers, Christmas day is as good as any other :)

For a long while i played mostly classic Colombian Cumbia from the Discos Fuentes “Golden Age”, but recently more and more quality urban electronic and digital Cumbia which combines bass and tradition, with lots of groove and soul, has been added to the crates. The tracks here encompass many different worlds simultaneously: Afro-Latin heritage, international electronics, Hiphop, Dancehall, Reggaeton, sometimes even East Asian or Middle Eastern sounding melodies. While many diverse elements are involved, I have stayed away from related styles such as reggaeton, Moombahton, Latin Hiphop, Latin House, Tribal Guarachero – the selections here are nearly all immediately recognizable as Cumbia, with the characteristic chugging rhythm and copious amounts of distinct accordion. Most of the big names in the game are represented here, as well as several relatively unknowns, and a few unreleased exclusives and special edits from me. It was also difficult to not include any of the hundreds of Classic or “Trad-Modern” all time favorites. There will be time for all that and above mentioned… hopefully :)

This wave of “Digital Cumbia” is of course only the latest in a series of revivals, reinventions, and re-constructions of the music. Its roots are several hundred years old, in the coastal areas of Colombia, from a cultural (and biological) fusion of Africans with indigenous populations (“gaitero” music made with the large Amerindian flute is a good example – check track 07 and 08), with influences from Europeans (accordion), as but 1 of dozens of Afro-Latin styles.   From its rural origins to modernization for urban audiences in the 1920s; its absorption of swing, jazz and other foreign sounds; building up to the “Golden Age” of the 60s and 70s; to relative negligence by the world at large for some decades as the ghetto music of the underclass; to where we are now, the context of this mix: Cumbia’s current place at the center of hipster party scenes world wide – it’s a long, fascinating, and complex story, told by quite a few different historians and musicologists, here are a few links, i encourage everyone to dig further into it:

Cumbia: The Construction of a Musical Genre in the Mid-twentieth Century

Cumbia: The Musical Backbone Of Latin America
Cumbia!  Scenes of a Migrant Latin American Music Genre

Latin America has of course a long history of struggle for justice, freedom, equality, and human rights, against repressive economic policies and disastrous political measures, mainly coming from and at the hands of the United States.  Just like in Africa, many democratically elected Latin American leaders were systematically removed and replaced by corrupt lapdogs in the making of foreign controlled states which brought immense suffering for local populations but made money for Corporations such as United Fruit (origin and meaning of the phrase Banana Republic).  Generations fought and survived, and today the fight continues against neoliberal global capitalism, which brings to the continent a new wave of intensified neo-colonial exploitation with disastrous social consequences and catastrophic environmental devastation.  In trying to acknowledge and spread awareness of these movements toward liberation in South America, and align good music with the people from whom it comes, the often under privileged and marginalized classes, this mix includes the sampled voices or words from Subcomandante Marcos, Che Guevara, Hugo Chavez,  Nicolas Maduro, an environmental activist, and Tanja Nijmeijer*.

* I hope the inclusion of the voice of this Farc member will not be offensive to anyone:  while i am aware that the integrity of the group has been increasingly compromised since the 1970s, this woman’s words here still ring true and i believe come from a place of sincerity.
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01 Chancha Via Circuito – Tornasol ft. Leandro Frías
02 Bigote – Bolivia en New Orleans
03 Pablo Tez – Maracuya
04 Huzur – Cu Mama La Obor
05 Cumbia Cosmonaut – Cumbianauts Incoming
06 Dengue Dengue Dengue – Simiolo (Sonidos Profundos rmx)
07 Rafael Aragon – Caribe año 68
08 Thornato – Caita Gaita
09 Chancha – Rio Arriba
10 Sonido Trucha – El Dios Del Rayo
11 Vetiver Bong – Vagabundub Worisé Remix
12 Rafael Aragon – Cumbia Piu-Piu (Pa Kongal Remix)
13 Plutarco – Esperando a Patricia (The French Dude Jungle Remix)
14 La Yegros – Trocitos De Madera
15 Dj Quien – Travesia Morena Gata
16 Third World Orchestra – La Cumbia de Los Pomberitos (Dengue Dengue Dengue Remix)
17 Dj Dice – Mueve El Bote (Original Mix)
18 Sonora Irreal – Mandando Sandanga
19 Alika – Para Bailar (El Hijo de la Cumbia Remix)
20 Alika Ft. El Traidor (Pibes Chorros) – Fuego Le Vamos a Dar (HydroSelekter Refix)
21 Fantasma – Cumbia que Paga
22 Sonido Guay Ne§â – Oye Mi Negra (Copia Doble Systema Remix)
23 Dj Joven – Los Esclavos del Hi Fi X Princesa
24 Animal Chuki – Capicúa
25 Frikstailers – Guacha (Maga Bo Remix)
26 Self Evident – The Cumbia Slagoff
27 LucÍ Fuerza – Ras Más Quema X Tatitron & Dany F- Sacu delo (Champerimbah) X Pa Kongal – Care Care (Dj Zhao Mash Edit)
28 Henry – 76.4 (Veneno)
29 Tu Guaina – Malevo
30 Princesa – Aqui (Marcelo Fabian REmix) X Mika Martini – Whyno (A. Blickmann Remix) (Dj Zhao Mash Edit)
31 Bomba Estereo – Caribbean Power (Ferozmonas Remix)
32 Dengue Dengue Dengue – Simiolo (Ferozmonas Remix)
33 Mr. Loso – Kumbia
34 The Binary Cumbia Orchestra – La Inconformable
35 Afro Kumbe – Bailalo
36 Dj Gecko ft. Xtremo Poder (Pal Celso Piña ) – La Dana Colombiana
37 Dj Javier Estrada – I Think About You
38 Sonido Del Principe X Moodymann – Detroit Riot Dub
39 Ricardo Villalobos X Doma Tornados – Baile Remix X Micaela Chauque – El Milagroso (Daleduro refix) (Dj Zhao Mash Edit)

Enjoy and have a great holidays!

NGOMA 16 – Love and Rebellion

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The only reason that I have stayed away from Reggae so far is because it is one of, if not THE most represented of Afro-Diasporic musical traditions from the Southern Hemisphere (as determined by various historical factors). But time has come for NGOMA series to dive right into the beautiful and intense sounds of Jamaica, time tested and honed to perfection.

First up is a mix of the best One Drop riddims and Modern Roots from the past few years: soul and consciousness for rebels and lovers, upliftment for the people, truth in the form of vibration. With the immersive consistency and homogeneity of a single kind of rhythm for 80 minutes, what comes to the foreground are the voices: fiery and sweet, agile and refined, full of hope and sorrow. The music here is a continuation of the classic and true roots sound and spirit, but the subject matter is wholly contemporary: suffering and struggle in the neo-colonial age, the crisis situation of late capitalism. First part of this mix is all about various forms of rebellion in the grim realities of this unequal and unjust world; and the second part involves the hazardous search for love in these trying times. Mix includes a few all time favorite riddims, some heavy new killers, and i & i don’t give a flying fuck what you think, the reggae version of a great mainstream pop tune.

This one will be followed, in the days and months ahead, by a badman dancehall volume of pure gangsterism, and after that, a no-holds-barred wild and crazy bouncement and party set for you to wine the waistline in time for spring break.

01 Queen Ifrica – Peace
02 Sizzla Kalonji – Jah Jah Blessing
03 Prophecy – How Could I?
04 Asfa – Not the Life
05 High Grade – Milk & Honey
06 High Grade – Weed Flex
07 Ritchie Spice – Ghetto Girl
08 I Wayne – Rasta Tell Dem All De While
09 Capleton – The Day Will Come
10 Alborosie – Rastafari Anthem
11 Tarrus Riley & Captain Sinbad – World Wide Rebellion
12 Konshens – War Straight
13 Kibaki – Pagans
14 Star – Treat Me Right
15 Chino – A Nuh Nothing
16 Bobby Treasure – Everybody Is Important
17 Kiprich – Tell Me Jah
18 Fanton Mojah – Dem Can’t Stop the Time
19 Chiney K – Me God Mi King (Papa Levi Tribute)
20 Cutty Ranks – Blood Stain
21 Dr. Evil – Wine Up Your Body
22 Kenyatta – Clarks
23 Busy Signal – Hustle
24 Kiprich – Who Say
25 Conrad Crystal ft. Suga Roy – Beat Them Bad
26 Chronixx – Start a Fire
27 Cecile – Popular Girl
28 Rihanna – Diamonds (J Vibe Remix)
29 R.C. – Customized Lady
30 Tanya Stephens – If You Knew
31 Etana feat. Busy Signal – Love Love Love
32 Christopher Martin – Top a Top
33 Cecile – Who You Love
34 Zj Liquid – One A Way
35 Delly Ranx – Work Hard
36 City Streetz Semi-Instrumental outro

NGOMA Classic 2 – AfroBeat

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Since Fela’s voice is much cooler than mine, i have switched out my intro with his, and this mix originally made to promote BlackBox number 1 has grown into a proper NGOMA release – with a few changes and much new goodness including 2 wicked special edits – one of the Ethio classic by Mahmoud Ahmed (following a funktastic number by Berlin’s own Woima Collective), and another of a very unique cosmic disco track by the techno head Lego Welt’s Afrocentric alter ego Nacho Patrol. Old version of this mix can still be heard Rebootfm – 11-dj-zhao-blackbox-1-ngoma”>here.

Again, no time for purism: music both classic and new is represented, African Jazz, Rock, Soul, Disco, with a few electronic remix treatments – within the loose parameters of the various related styles comprising the “Afrobeat” constellation, the primary concern here is the dance floor.
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01 Fela Intro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
02 Kokolo – Late Night, Closed Eyes (White Mike Mix)
03 Umoja – Amou Baleke
04 Ogyatanaa Show Band – Disco Africa
05 Manu Dibango – Souk Fiesta
06 Ofege – Adieu
07 Oghene Kologbo – Na Yawa
08 Tony Allen – Get Together
09 Saravah – Soul Supersossego
10 Woima Collective – Marz
11 Mahmoud Ahmed – Bemen Sebeb Letlash (Ngoma Push Edit)
12 Soul Jazz Orchestra – Mugambi
13 Soul Jazz Orchestra – The Blind Leading the Blind
14 Ebo Taylor Jr. – Children Don’t Cry
15 Gabo Brown & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – It’s A Vanity
16 Antoine Dougbé & Orchestre Poly Rythmo – Ya Mi Ton
17 L. Barrabas – Tabou For The People (Sofrito Edit)
18 Candido – Jingo
19 Nacho Patrol – Africa Space Program (Ngoma Hardhouse Edit)
20 Jimi Tenor & Kabu Kabu – Global Party
21 Soul Ascendants – Tribute
22 Cesaria Evora – Nho Antone Escade
23 Manu Dibango – Ceddo End Title
24 Fela Outro / Tony Allen – Push Your Mind (Break Beat Remix)
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FUSION 7 – A.F.R.O.

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“The drum is closely linked in African philosophy with the word… The original utterance which created life of nothingness and chaos, and then established order in that creation. The drum is therefore a divine tool of the Supreme Being, a womb or beginning of created life.”  – Maureen Warner-Lewis

“The drum encloses a womb of space in which silence and identity will emerge out of the darkness and the void.” – Wilson Harris

“”God is dumb, until the drum speaks.” – Ancient African proverb

Drawing upon the vast rhythmic resources across the mother continent, from places like Botswana, Burundi, Uganda, Ghana, Congo, Morocco, and more, with a touch of Afro-Cuba and the Afro-Caribbean, as well as selection and sampling of some of the great electronic music of today, FUSION 7 builds a fortress to dance, a bridge between today’s electronic dance music and its roots on the Mother Continent.  Even more than the Afro-Asian House of FUSION 3 and Middle Eastern Bass of FUSION 4, this 7th volume of pure African Percussion and Techno/Bass is firmly situated on the dance floor.

As we take synthetic drugs in the context of today’s commercialized club culture, it is important to know that dance music is neither frivolous or inconsequential:  rhythm was important for the evolutionary process of our species in terms of motor functions and socialization, and dancing is a sacred activity which connects us both to each other, as well as to the vibrations of the heavenly spheres.

01 Heart Beat Intro / Tuareg Traditional X dima – monolog
02 Guem & Zaka – Printemps X Yonurican – Lucha Machete
03 El Hadj Ensemble – Wo Mawu X Fast Vision Soul – Babatunde
04 Soweto Ensemble – Nxal X Unknown
05 Bukky Leo & Black Egypt – Black Egypt
06 Gordeon Odametey – Okemi Ekpe X Queen Atom – Minsk
07 Kasai Allstars – Mukuba Special X Shakleton X Wiley – Where’s My Brother (Trebus    Funky Dub)
08 Moritz Von Oswald Trio – Pattern 3 X MicroTribe
09 Afronaut – Neuvo Rumbero X Echologist feat. The Space Ape – Mercy Beat (MRI vs Uess Nondub Remix)
10 Calypso Jazz Improvisation With Steel Drums X Caja De Ritmos – Drumstep X          Echologist feat. The Space Ape – Mercy Beat (MRI vs Uess Nondub Remix)
11 Shackleton – It’s Not Easy X Rhythmic Theory – Riveted
12 Percussion3 X Kamikaze Space Programme – Lawn (Dj Zhao Short Edit)
13 Guem & Zaka – Turon X Roska – Jackpot
14 Tambours Du Burundi – Uri Inyambo Burundi + LR Groove – Bush Man
15 Guem – Topil X Gender – Behind the Forest
16 Hammana Manden Kono A Nakan X Edu K – Avec Bon Bons
17 El Hadj Ensemble – Wo Mawu X Cabo Snoop – Windeck (Arih Gold & Gil Perez Remix)
18 Guem & Zaka – Liberte X BWG – Mandombanzani
19 Guem & Zaka – Liberte X Ventress – Typhon
20 Tuareg Traditional X Ardisson – The End (Posthuman Remix) X Ventress – Typhon / Heartbeat

Afro Beets

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Afro Beets is the hottest new musical genre on the planet.

 

Just kidding, Afro Beets is not a genre. And neither is Afro Beats, the rather silly name coined by some UK radio dj to hype his show that seems to have stuck. What we really have here is Electronic Pop and Dance music from West Africa, specifically Hiplife and modern Highlife from Ghana, and Naija Jams from Nigeria (with a touch of Coupe Decale from the Ivory Coast and South African House for good measure).

The term “Afro Beats” has the most tenuous of links to its reference – Ice Prince has not much to do, musically, thematically, anything-cally, with Fela Kuti. About the only link between “Afro Beats” and the Afro-Funk/Soul/Rock of the 1970s, what is known as Afro Beat, is the same place of origin. While the differences are many: 70s Afro Beat was of course Funk and Blues based, while these new styles use beats related to Afro-House and Reggaeton, bass-lines from Highlife and Rumba, vocals a mix of local styles and Jamaican Dancehall and American R’n’B/Rap, with healthy doses of techno-rave energy. While 1970s Afrobeat often spread conscious political messages which passionately spoke of social realities and the struggle against oppression, these new forms of pop music deliver an entirely hedonistic message which passionately speak about glamour, escape, sex, and money.

Purist of both the musical and political variety, please let go of your seriousness and get with the serious boogie. To the “Drum Machines Have No Soul” type i say don’t forget that the 70s musicians you worship all embraced the latest technologies and sounds of their day. To people who take issue with the materialism this music espouses, from a dj thoroughly dedicated to anti-capitalism: dance music, with its anarchic celebration of pleasure and wanton disregard for the law, is always in essence, if not on the surface, anti-authoritarian; and partying, even in these bleak times, can still be an insurrectionary activity, disruptive of hum-drum consumerist routine.

But whatever. Love it or leave it. And whatever we call it, if it even is an “it”, the sweet grooves and irresistible hooks of this action packed music is not only the perfect summer party soundtrack, but simply the most uninhibited fun your money can buy, anywhere.

Though of course this download is free :)

P.S. Track 21, called Azonto Decale, is by the Focus Allstars, a pan-African musical force which grew out of the Focus Organization. If you are in London they do proper events (next one tomorrow Friday 21 of June): ymlp.com/ziZL7k

01 Artquake – Alanta Instrumental Intro
02 P-Square – Trowey!
03 J Martins ft. Fally Ipupa – Jupa Global Remix
04 Nhyiraba Kojo ft. Sammy – Baba God
05 Ghana Blast – Odwa (Raggao)
06 Obour ft. Morris She & Batman – Konkonti Baa
07 Unknown – Unknown
08 FBS ft. Tinny – Oldman Boogey Remix
09 Bradez & Ephraim – Ego Bee
10 X-Pensive Nframa – Aunty Adoley
11 Baby Jet – African Woman
12 Side 1 – One By One
13 Ruff n Smooth ft. S.K. Blinks – Azingele
14 Bigiano – Eyin’ Temi
15 Ephraim – Follow Follow
16 Stay J – Shashee Wowo (Kaxtro Remix)
17 D’banj – Oliver Twist
18 D’banj – Oliver Twist (Uhuru Remix)
19 Edem – Over Again
20 Joey B, Gary, and E.L. – Ice Cream Girl
21 Focus Allstars – Azonto Decale
22 P-Square – Danger
23 AQ – Wahala Dey
24 Sarkodie ft. E.L. – U Go Kill Me
25 Obumpa Rek, Austine B. Agaspa – U Go Kill Me Version
26 Olamide – First of All
27 Dr. Slim ft. Double – Seke (prod. by Eyoh Soundboy)
28 E.L. – Obuu Mo
29 Blaka – Tozo
30 E.L. ft. Appietus & Geelex – Bend Ya Body
31 Guru ft. Edja – Lapas Toyota
32 Guantoa – Asore Party
33 Double – Walai Talai
34 Unknown – K
35 Double 5.5 – Uhm Ahh
36 Dee Moneey – Kpokpo O Body
37 T.I.V. – Beremole
38 Lil Shaker – Pressure Sorrr
39 Kojo Antwi – Osebo

Heart of Light

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“Heart of Light” – the last words uttered publicly by democratically elected first president of newly independent Congo Patrice Lumumba at his inauguration address, 3 months before his murder by Belgium and CIA, because he dared to oppose the Western forces of oppression and planned to keep the wealth of the Congo for the Congo.  Freedom and hope was killed in 1961, with disastrous consequences that last until today, but The Heart of Light can never die…

MORE OPTIONS – STREAM:  MIXCLOUD

Rumba traveled back to Africa via Cuba and Haiti in the 40s and 50s, later developing into Soukous, arguably peaking in the 60s and 70s, and lived on well into the 90s with a more streamlined and modern sound. This mix is only a tiny slice of this glorious sound from the later periods: 4 on the floor, with enough bass for modern dance floors.  Excluded are examples from the ocean of older, incredibly varied recordings, of supreme beauty and artistic merit but many of which sadly have poor sound quality, as the best musicians in the world were, and are, often recording under the worst conditions and with the worst equipment.

Despite being the biggest African music export in history, African Rumba is still criminally under exposed in the Northern Hemisphere.  Yet this music is crucial, and should be very important to anyone interested in Dance Music, anyone interested in Pop, in Rock, in Soul,  in Jazz, in Funk, in Reggae, etc.  Objectively speaking, in terms of raw musicianship, in terms of composition and arrangement, and if we break down the rhythms and melodies to mathematical patterns and study them, these highly evolved structures are perfectly designed and executed in every way.

I grew up with Industrial Noise, Punk, and Metal, and it wasn’t until my late 20s/early 30s until i was emotionally mature enough to appreciate amazing sounds like this. Please leave your cynicism at the door and embrace this music, for the truth is, something Africans have known all along, that ultimately the most powerful revolutionary force, of which the powers are afraid, is not anger — it is love.

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01 Sam Mangwana – Liwa Ya Niekesse
02 Orchestra Makassy – Kufulisika Sio Kilema
03 Papa Noel – Bel Ami
04 Kosmos Moutouari – Liberte
05 4 Stars – Mayanga
06 Kanda Bongo Man – Ebeneza
07 Mpongo Love = Femme Commerçante
08 Unknown – Zoum
09 Sam Mapangala – Dunia Tuna Pita (We’re Just Passing Through the World)
10 Kanda Bongo Man – J.T.
11 Bilenge Musica Du Zaire – Wazazi Wangu
12 Empire Bakuba – Nazingi Maboko
13 Alain Kounkou – Soukouss Grands Effets
14 Nyboma – Maya
15 Elali – Mawa (Ngai Mawa)
16 Synthez – Virée aux Antilles
17 Fifi Map – Libala Ya Bomwana
18 Africa Maestro – Na Decide
19 Bicko Tchéké – C’est chic
20 Kanda Bongo Man – Sango
21 Meiway – Nanan
22 Luambo Lwanza Makiadi & L’Orchestre TPOK Jazz (Franco) – Casier Judiciare

NGOMA 15 – DRUM Amandla

DRUM_amandla_600 Rougher and tougher twin of the previous DRUM volume, Amandla explores the somber and serious side of contemporary electronic dance music from South Africa and Angola.  In 2013 capitalist brainwashing and new waves of cultural and economic imperialism replaces the overtly oppressive policies of Apartheid and colonialism; inequity, injustice, and corruption still pandemic on the African continent; but the indestructible beat of Soweto, Pretoria and Luanda lives on.  These new urban sounds express the frustration, longing, joy and hope of a new generation, the continuing struggle and POWER of the people.  Rhythm as a weapon, music as a weapon: a real weapon in the concrete sense.  Africa!  Mayibuye!  Amandla!

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: MEDIAFIRE

01 Osunlade feat. Bajka – Argy (Stripped Mix)
02 Dj Vinny Q feat. Minister – Amazulo (Wave Drumz Calling)
03 Dj Vetkuk Vs Mahoota – Istokvela
04 Afrikan Roots ft. Buckz – Sesha
05 Dj Vetkuk & Mahoota
06 Infinite Boys – Cina
07 DJ Djeff feat. Maskarado – Elegom Bounsa (Filipe Narciso Deepduro Remix)
08 Onyenze – Ogidi (Djeff & Silyvi Remix)
09 Spikiri – Follow Me
10 Dj Malvado feat. Eddy Tussa – Zenze (Maphorisa n Clap Uhuru Remix)
11 Strong Root feat. Zulu – Matimba (Dj Hp Afro Mix)
12 Dj Satellite – Boss In Beat (Original Mix)
13 Black Motion ft Zulu – Bhana Shilolo (Dj Satelite Remix)
14 Black Motion – Banane Mavoko
15 Dj Dorivaldo Mix e Dj Helio Baiano ft. Maya – Átabomeky (Bokoyébate)
16 Dj Znobia – Baza
17 Dj Znobia – Africa
18 Cabo Snoop – Windeck (Black Motion Remix)
19 Dj Malvado – Ka-Tuki
20 Big Nuz – Serious

NGOMA 14 – DRUM

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This edition in the Ngoma Mix Series focuses on new 125 bpm African Electronic Dance Music.  As i have argued in the “Real Roots of Kwaito” piece for This Is Africa, American and European Disco, House, and Hiphop were crucially influential in the beginning stages of development of post-Apartheid South African urban music, but since then SA House and Kwaito have matured and grown into its own skin, much more an extension of indigenous rhythm cultures than related to “Western” dance music.  For example the beat patterns in these tracks are distinctly different: the constant off-beat high hats found in the US and Europe are almsot entirely absent; and with much more rich and developed rhythm elements and very different emphasis, this music should probably be thought of as simply new African dance music, with not much to do with what is traditionally known as “House” or “Techno” at all.  

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD //// DOWNLOAD: ZIPPY OR MEDIAFIRE

Selections come mainly from South Africa and Angola, with lots of percussion, many balafons, a touch of jazz, some diasporic elements from Cuba and Colombia, couple tunes made in Spain, and a  shot of Nigerian Pop at the peak.  This is the first part, relatively bright in feel:  stay tuned for DRUM 2 – the dark side.

01 Dj Shimza & Cuebur Ft 340ml – Let The Sunshine (Reprise)
02 Invaders Of Africa – Impi Yamakhanda
03 Culoe De Song – Tsonga Song
04 Pro Tee – Thee Broken Keys
05 Dj Small Jon – Return Of the Drum
06 Black Motion feat. Nqobi  – Second Thoughts
07 Dr Ada T feat. Muzaic – Ewe
08 Jason Cheiron – Primal
09 Monocles, Slezz – Umba Kayo (Dj Alpha Kazu Dub)
10 Mbuandje – Mbuandja (Reprise) + Zozo – Totos Dance
11 Pablo Fierro – Agua (Nuevayorkquinas Mix)
12 Pablo Fierro – Sandulivi
13 Kosha Roots – Revival
14 Homeboyz Muzik – Samburu (Jungle Drums Original)
15 Dj Ad feat ZB E PJ – Patagoloza
16 Heavy K feat. Sarah Webster- The Gun Song (A Lesson Twice Learned Edit)
17 Lvovo – Original
18 3G Music – Vagabos
19 Pinto Dos Santos – Ma’e
20 Dj Kapiro & Mad Aksoul – Akanela (Oliver Twist Theme) + Estelle ft. D’banj – Oliver Twist (Remix)
21 Big Nuz – Rockafella
22 Franklin Rodriques – Para Na Wey
23 The Busy Twist – LDN Luanda
24 Dj Satellite & Dj Patrick – Malembe, Malembe
25 Boddhi Satva feat. Mangala Camara – Nankoumandjan (Dekalstrumental Mix)

FUSION 5 – هلاك / Apocalypse

neocolonialism. exploitation. corporate greed. systemic oppression. global warming. over population. rising oceans. resource depletion. military conflict. economic collapse. mass extinction. hurricanes. famine. disease. hunger. war. annihilation.

OR: STREAM: MIXCLOUD // DOWNLOAD: MEDIAFIRE

01 Amina Alaoui & Jon Balke – Itimad X L-Wiz – Smogged
02 Ora Sittner & Youval Micenmacher – Dror Iqra X Scuba – Sleepa
03 23 Skidoo – G-2 Contemplation X Marc Ashken – Roots Dyed Dark (Skream Remix)
04 Kambarkan Folk Ensemble – Jygach Ooz Komuz X Dj Distance – Nomad
05 Sarah Webster – A Lesson Twice Learned / Drum Talk X Pinch & Loefah – Broken
06 JilJilala – Unknown X JuJu – Iroko
07 Fawzy Al-Aiedy – Milad X Toasty – Like Sun
08 Hossam Ramzy & Phil Thornton – Immortal Egypt X dj quest & eskimo – Speakers Corner (Instrumental Death Edit)
09 Unknown – Arab Flute X Zen Militia – Pull of Guilt (Scuba Remix)
10 Unknown – Morocco Belly Dance X Substep Infrabass Monotonium
11 Guem – Royal Dance X Shed – Panamax Remix
12 Unknown – African Tribal Drums X Unkown – UK Grime
13 Reda Darwish – Raqset El Banat X Headhunter – Drop The Waste
14 Remko Scha – Machine Guitars Slam X Skream – Backwards
15 Andy Moor – Uganda Fly X Loefah – Fire Elements
16 Sir Richard Bishop – Blood Stained Sands X Tunnidge – Face Melt
17 Sijano Vodjani – Dedication X King Midas Sound – Earth a kill ya

Sonic Liberation Front

Made this for ultra cool international / art / architecture / concept / urbanism / fashion / music / design organization Platoon: United rhythms towards a borderless future: African House and European Acid, Hungarian Folk and Korean Pop, Cumbia Electro and Arabic Techno, Avant Jazz and Street Bass – international beats for dance floors and head space – against prejudice and xenophobia.  DOWNLOAD:  mediafire

Sound culture in the Heart of Light

and here is a repost from the old blog, of classic Congolese Rumba, literally the sweetest sounds i have ever heard.

tracklisting: volume 1 / volume 2.

Big big thanks to Bolingo69 for the original upload.  It is criminal that these heavenly sounds are out of print and commercially unavailable anywhere.  Here are both volumes together on mediafire.

And I’ve been meaning to do an official NGOMA volume of modern dance floor Soukous for some time…  it will happen soon.  But until then, there are lots of awesome tunes in this episode of Radio Ngoma:

NGOMA Soundsystem Vol. 1

A hybrid musical entity made of dj and live instrumentation consisting of 2, 3, 4, or 5 members, NGOMA Soundsystem fuses Ancestral Rhythms, Acoustic Textures, and Urban Bass Pressure.  Drawing from both the wealth of sonic traditions from Africa and beyond as well as up-to-the-minute street sounds worldwide, NGOMA Soundsystem exists in the tension between electronic composition and live improvisation, creating unique “Ancient-Futurist” musical experiences for both concert hall and club, often at once mind expanding and dance-floor smashing.

this recording is a 1 hour studio edit of the 3 hour live performance at Fusion Festival:

Dj Zhao: Edits, Mixing and Selection (Berlin)
Werner Puntigam: Trombones (recorded in Linz, Austria)
Marcel: Percussion (recorded in Berlin)